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May 11, 2017

Self-drafted Pants for My FIT Menswear Patternmaking Class


Not much of a sketch, I know, and it's on the back of an envelope (above), but this is the design I came up with as one of my final projects for the menswear patternmaking class I've been taking at FIT (Fashion Institute of Technology).  It's due next week.

The asymmetrical design is made up of multiple panels that button onto each other.  We're required to make our final garments in cotton muslin and, in addition to the garment, we must produce the paper pattern complete with notches, seam allowances, and grain guidelines.  Every piece must be clearly labelled.

I still have a little work to do on the paper pattern but the pants themselves are finished.



I based the pants on a fitted sloper I created in class in my size.  The edge of each panel is finished with a 1" wide, interfaced facing.  (They're interfaced so they can support either buttonholes or buttons.)



These weren't difficult to make but there were many pieces and edges to finish, since right and left sides, as well as fronts and backs, are all unique.  Everything is labeled so I know what fits into what. I used my Singer buttonhole attachment (attached to my Singer 15-91) to make my buttonholes, and zigzagged my buttons into place with my Bernina 930.

I think the effort paid off: the pants are something special and they fit well too.




The pants have a traditional fly and waistband, two side pockets and, in back, two single-welt pockets.





I hope to make these up in fashion fabric later this month.  I need to decide what fabric to make them with and whether I should use all one color or try color-blocking.  My only concern about using more than one color is I don't know how much I'd wear them.  With a single color, the effect of the asymmetrical panels is more subtle; I like that.

What do you think?  Multiple colors or a single shade -- or something else entirely  I'd love to hear your input!

Have a great day, everybody!


Thanks, Wouter, for whipping up these color-blocking concepts in Photoshop!

41 comments:

  1. The muslin looks great so I am thinking tan or khaki would look wonderful, but the wheat colour is so summery and crisp looking. You could do fun things with the buttons. Or Not. I am sure whatever you choose will look fabulous. Once again a great finished product.

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  2. ooooombreeeeee...

    (that's me whispering "ombré")

    these are just fantastic!

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  3. You can always make up several pairs in different colors and switch out sections when you feel bold. The pants are wonderful. I love monochromatic, especially love unbleached muslin.

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  4. What about a double sided fabric so the differences aren't too drastic? It could be more about texture than color.

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  5. I think your muslin looks perfect for going on vacation!

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  6. Love your sketch. LOVE IT! Really – have you ever thought of doing fashion illustration? You've got a breezy, louche style which I adore. Makes me want, want, want. And isn't that what illustration is supposed to do?
    As to you new pants – why not make two pair? Bright summer ones with lots of different colours and then a more subdued pair out of light wool for Spring, Summer and Autumn.
    Vancouver Barbara

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  7. All one color will focus attention on the panels, which are your invention. They can and should stand alone, at least the first time. Later on you can do color blocking, but don't lose site of the center of attention.

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    1. Oops, that's "sight", of course. If you don't lose sight, I will try not to lose my English.

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    2. My thoughts exactly! I love the design of the pants! Don't loose that in color blocking. One color! Great design.

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  8. I too think all one color will let the wonderful proportion of your lines and angles be the focus...after we have marveled at all those successful buttonholes. I've so enjoyed vicariously attending your classes and this is another fabulous project.

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  9. All one color, but maybe a pattern--stripe?--changing direction.

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  10. One color. The design is strong enough to stand on its own without additional features.

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  11. One color. Great looking pants. The fit is perfect.

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  12. Would you ever wear them as shorts, with just some of the panels?

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  13. Bravo, these are fantastic looking trousers from an inspired idea. I'm sure whatever you chose for the fashion fabric will be perfect.

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  14. In raw silk, with sandals, on your farmer's marker jaunts, those envy-inducing vacations you take with Michael, and of course when you're trying to look all Yorkville-in-Midtown.

    P.S. Your illustrations have always conveyed the concept compellingly.

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  15. Great design. Please, one color.

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  16. Cotton twill in light pink. Or maybe that's just me!

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  17. Great looking trousers, Peter. I think a solid or something that reads as a solid would be best for the first official garment.

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  18. Very nice fit of your pattern! With the panels and buttons, I would definitely go with one color of fabric and buttons in the same color family. That would make the pants eye catching but not eye popping. With the warm weather around the corner, how about a summer color and fabric?

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  19. For myself to wear, I'd make every single piece out of a different bright, wild pattern -- none of which relates to any other piece in theme or colors, if possible. But that's just me.

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  20. I like these a lot. I would go with a lightweight pant fabric and choose a single light color, such as cream or khaki. I can picture these on a summer cruise.

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  21. Congrats on a fab vision - and excellent execution, natch!
    I'm on board the one colour train ... perhaps with contrast top stitching (rather than contrast buttons). Summer linen comes to mind ...

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  22. Maybe the right and wrong sides of one fabric for a subtle difference, or something where there's a (fairly low key) nap that you could alternate?
    It would have to be different enough that it didn't look like a mistake, though...

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  23. For fabric I would look to linnen.

    As to the single color versus color block, you can take this muslin and throw the it into a die bath piece by piece. If you add some waiting periods between adding the pieces, they'll each get a different amount of coloring and thus a different saturation. You'd be able to judge if you like the color block effect without having to make another one.

    Alternatively: Photoshop.

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    Replies
    1. Quick and dirty: https://goo.gl/photos/UPSp4qcSk1XobzRv6

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    2. Thank you, Wouter! That's so cool. I guess I could also make the right and left top sides different colors too.

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    3. Why didn't I think of that?
      https://goo.gl/photos/rL2niUBmFNxaxApm9

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    4. Faded denim....
      https://goo.gl/photos/viux86Buc6K9C1Cs9

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    5. I love the denim shades. Thanks again!

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  24. I had a pair of pants just like these in all black from Hot Topic about a decade ago. Wearing them while waiting in line for concerts led to people unbuttoning them, both in line and not. Amazing what boundaries people would ignore because of the shiny buttons! Now, from an outside perspective, the proportions of the legs look very off kilter because of the difference in spacial separation. One leg looks much more visually appealing than the other because of the shortening of the calf. If I were you, I'd sew those buttons down permanantly so no one tries t mess with your legs... or bring your dog to guard you...

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  25. Actually, the muslin looks quite nice--very comfortable and perfect for summer. I would go with lightweight fabric in a solid color (taupe, linen, khaki, cream) which would accentuate the buttons and stitching on your leg panels. You would have pants which would be appropriate for many situations. Don't use multi color panels, especially if you are making long pants. Colors MIGHT work for shorts/beach wear, but definitely not for everyday use. BTW, Peter, your stitching is SO precise!

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  26. I too think your design is unique, fun, stylish and wearable. May I suggest that they seem short especially for that full of a pant leg at the bottom. I think a summer color linen would be fun such as a coral. Love following you and your adventures at FIT.

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  27. These trousers are a beautiful design. I think that one colour would be much better but what about differently faded demin like the left Photoshop-coloured picture? The fit on them is lovely. Xx

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  28. Those are the coolest pants I ever saw. One color is the best. Another vote for linen! The muslin looks like linen already and looks totally wearable now.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks! I think I'm going to start with a solid and take it from there.

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  29. Monochromatic, let the angles and fasteners be the star. There's a lot going on here. Interesting metal buttons or snaps on a dark ground would be cool.

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